08 Jun

Half Light

While I was setting up and celebrating Homefront & Downrange in North Carolina, my friends and co-conspirators Natalya Aikens and Vivien Zepf were setting up a group show of our work, plus that of two more in the circle, Robin Ferrier and Deborah Boschert.

The Gloaming is a presentation of contemporary art, inspired by the magical time betwixt day and night, eliciting myriad transitions. The art is manifested in fiber-based media, from cloth to paper and plastic, in sizes large and small.

The five artists in this group show hail from across the United States. We initially came to know one another through artist groups on the internet; later, more personal conversations ensued and friendships were born. This is the group’s first collaborative exhibition though individually, each artist has shown work in juried art exhibitions and been published.

We each included one larger piece and one 12″ x 12″ piece, all inspired by the colors of the gloaming — that period just as the sun sets when glowing gold mixes with twilight blue. My piece was inspired by the prominent transition in my life right now, my husband’s retirement from the Army. When I started the piece it was loosely based on a flag, with the structure of the stripes going dark in deep blues, purples and greens. The straight stripes was contrasted with an exuberant field of oranges and golds representing the possibilities awaiting in the next day. I was nearly finished when I decided that it was boring me and what I really wanted to do was to work on an improvisational scrap piece that was waiting for me to take a break from artworks with deadlines and purposes.

Half Light Medallion web


Half Light Medallion, by Kristin La Flamme 2015

So I changed course, and started fresh. I dumped out all my scraps in Gloaming colors and proceeded to make a new piece, starting from the center out in a Medallion Quilt style. While this one is conceptually further from my original intent, it still retains a bit of structure in the center, which dissolves into scrappy chaos, and then a casual twilight of spiky challenges next to peaceful star-filled spaces.It’s a little bit landscape, and a little bit reflection on transitions. Mostly it was a whole lot of fun to make as I figured it out as I went along.

If you are within visiting distance of Larchmont, NY, please come and see all our pieces on view from now until June 30th. Vivien and Natalya will be giving an artist’s talk on the 14th from 2-4pm. Please come.

June 2nd – 30th, 2015
Etui Fiber Arts
2106 Boston Post Road
Larchmont, NY


25 May

Quilt National ’15

First off, nothing beats seeing your own work on display. It always looks better at a venue than it does stuffed somewhere in the studio. Context helps too. Needless to say, seeing any artwork in person is better than online or in a book. That’s not always practical, but it is so worth it when possible.

QN 1


Second,  the whole weekend series of events around Quilt National was fun. Like going to the IQF quilt show in Houston, there’s inspirational work to see, but much of the adventure is about meeting one’s peers and connecting over shared experiences and insightful conversations. Quilt National is the premier show for contemporary art quilts, and much more than the basically traditional IQF, or QuiltCon shows, this is my element. Gallery type shows like this, Art Quilt Elements, Visions, and the like are where my work fits best, and where I can connect with peers who approach to their work in a mindset similar to my own (that’s not to say any group is exclusive or monolithic).

QN 2

It’s great to see old friends and acquaintances and to make new ones. I made the trip with my good friends Lorie McCown, who had work in the show too, and Jill Kertulla who was just plain curious about this art quilt world she’s recently entered. I love seeing Betty Busby everywhere I go. Her smiling face and welcoming attitude is just a joy. And now I can add Maria Shell amongst others to my growing list of inspiring ladies I know. And yes, there was a lot of laughter and silliness with these ladies and more.

QN 3

Here’s Juror Rosalie Dace talking to Betty about the scale of Betty’s fantastic vessel. That may really be what the weekend was about: three days of talking to each other about all aspects of our art. So so so fun and interesting and fulfilling.

QN 4

In addition to the small group chats that happen organically  at the meal table, and with a glass of wine by the pool, or on a walk between the Barn and the hotel, each artist attending had the opportunity to talk more formally about their specific piece. These two minute recordings will soon be available to view via the Dairy Barn website. My photo of Deidre Adams was unflattering so yo only get to see teeny tiny Deidre on the camera. Her work is one of those that must be seen in person to be fully appreciated.

QN 5a

Here’s Inge Hüber’s work two ways. What often gets lost in photos is that the colors shift as you view it from different angles.

QN 5b


Diane Nuñez’s dimensional work grew when installed because the lighting adds wonderful patterns to the floor.

QN 6


I only took photos with my phone, and didn’t even spend much time at that, really wanting to soak up the people while I could. Rather than share crappy photos of peoples’ beautiful work, I’ll just show a few details that caught my eye and suggest that those interested can seek out better images via each artist.


QN 8

The splatters and thin lines of Sandra Poteet’s “Open Spaces” intrigued me.


QN 7

The lovely drawing and spare stitches in Kate Gorman’s “A Keeper of Secrets and Parakeets” reminds me of the delicate illustration style that is popular in other arenas.


QN 9

“Femoral Fracture: A Fall” by Helen Geglio was full of lovely hand stitched detail, as is my friend Lorie’s work “The Story Quilt.” We decided the two pieces must be cousins.


QN 10

Pam RuBert’s “London – Wish You Were Hair” included a fun surprise.

Overall, I thought the show was of consistent and high quality. The jurors gave a talk on Saturday and were unanimous in stating that they picked the best work from what was presented, without regard to ratios, themes, or trends. Just art that had good visual impact and something that made you want to come back and learn more. With that I’m heading back to my regular life, but now with my creative tank full, and hopefully ready to contemplate and then create more worthy art.

25 May


I am proud to say that ‘Murica, from my Security Blanket series, is part of Quilt National ’15, the nineteenth international juried competition for new, innovative quilts, and that I can now share it publicly!

Murica horiz web

The flag is made up of many guns appliquéd from used clothing and other household textiles, and then outlined in a variety of hand embroidered stitches commonly used on crazy quilts.


I think it’s pretty self explanatory. For me, it essentially represents America’s obsession with guns, and specifically the craziness of the human toll it takes in the name of safety. Hopefully it’s open enough that others are able to infuse some of their own interpretations as well. I hope it’s a conversation starter.

This quilt and many others in a variety of aesthetic approaches and subject matter can be seen in the cloth from May 23rd – September 7th, 2015 at The Dairy Barn Arts Center, and then in smaller traveling groups for the next two years.

19 May

The Gloaming

My wonderful circle of friends and I will be exhibiting together in June for the first time! I won’t be able to attend the reception, but I highly encourage anyone in the NY area to go. We created work based on the evocative colors of the gloaming, and it should be wonderful!

The Gloaming is a presentation of contemporary art, inspired by the magical time betwixt day and night, eliciting myriad transitions. The art is manifested in fiber-based media, from cloth to paper and plastic, in sizes large and small.

The five artists in this group show hail from across the United States. They initially came to know one another through artist groups on the internet; later, more personal conversations ensued and friendships were born. This is the group’s first collaborative exhibition though individually, each artist has shown work in juried art exhibitions and been published.

Gloaming Flyer web
05 Feb

Privacy in America Group Show

Privacy in America is hung and already inspiring closer looks and conversation.

On the wall is “Temporary Safety” which was nearly done when the show was conceived and just perfect for the theme. I couldn’t be happier to finally see it hanging with other work asking similar questions.

Privacy in America Group Show

My work is just two Security Blankets hung with paintings, drawings, assemblages, and sculpture by my talented peers at McGuffey Art Center in Charlottesville, VA. I have not previously shown my newest work, Exposed, in it’s entirety. It is two-sided and big and thus a pain to photograph, so I didn’t even bother. I will have it professionally photographed at the end of the show, but for now, in situ photos are as good as it gets. I am so happy with the way the exhibition comittee hung this piece. It really commands the hallway gallery.


Privacy in America Group Show


Please join us for a First Friday reception on February 6th from 5:30 to 7:30. If you can’t make it to the opening, the show will be on view through the month of February.

Privacy postcard email2

07 Oct


About a year ago the United States was slogging through a government shutdown. I went to DC and sat for a small while deconstructing an American flag as a metaphor for what I saw our congress doing. I blogged about it here. Since then, I have used those flag parts for several art quilts. One was as a base for “Dominant” which was shown in SAQA’s regional show Tarnish last May.

I haven’t shared my second piece as yet because I decided to submit it to Quilt National. Today, I found out that one of the two pieces I submitted was accepted (yay!) and so the other was rejected (also yay because now I can share it!).

DeathShroud_detail web

Death Shroud for Democracy” is constructed of a deconstructed flag, used clothing, and a vintage sheet. It should be obvious that it references the Shroud of Turin. Death Shroud expresses my frustration and disappointment with the state of American politics particularly since 2010.

Death Shroud web

I probably should have more to say about this piece, but I’m not sure I need or want to put it into words. I suspect everyone can have their own conversation with it. As for the other, somewhat related, piece that DID get into Quilt National, we’ll have to wait until May 2015 to see that one.

24 Jul

Temporary Safety

As I wind down my Army Wife series, I have been thinking about Security Blankets. I love the play on words, especially since I always strive to make the medium of my work an integral part of the message. I have ideas for at least four textiles that fit under the general umbrella of security. Two are recently finished. The first, I’ve been working on for nearly a year, and posted some peeks along the way, but then removed them as I considered submitting the piece to Quilt National. They have very strict rules about the quilts or any parts being published prior to their unveiling. Anyway, I changed my mind when one of the other artists at McGuffey Art Center proposed a show about Privacy in America which I thought would be a perfect venue for the first of my “blankets.”

"Temporary Safety" 2014, Kristin La Flamme

“Temporary Safety” 2014, Kristin La Flamme

“Temporary Safety” is a pixelated image of a security camera in which the pixels contain circles and rectangles (0s and 1s) which spell out in binary Benjamin Franklin’s quote, They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”


"Temporary Safety," detail.

“Temporary Safety,” detail.

It’s true human size in that it’s over 90″ long. When a friend suggested I call it Linus, I came up with a six degrees type description: This is a Security Blanket. It has an image of a security camera and a quote by Benjamin Franklin. The Peanuts character Linus has a Security Blanket. Benjamin Linus is a character on LOST, played by actor Michael Emerson. Emerson also plays a character named Harold Finch on Person of Interest. Person of Interest is about utilizing the spying capabilities of security cameras and other methods of data collection.The show is also about protecting people — like a Security Blanket. Cool, it goes full circle! 😉

06 Jun


The Service Flag quilt exists no more. It has been transformed. I am calling the series quilted art on canvas, and I see it as decor more than anything else. I made a variety of sizes, and I still have some bits left over if I want to keep going!

Presenting Americana:

Americana I web
Americana I, 16″x20″ $350


Americana II web
Americana II, 16″x20″, $350


Americana III web
Americana III, 24″x8″ $200


Americana IV web
Americana IV, 12″x12″ SOLD


Americana V web
Americana V, 12″x12″ $225


Americana VI web
Americana VI, 10″x10″ SOLD


Americana VII web
Americana VII, 10″x10″ $150


Americana 8-11 web


Americana VIII web
Americana VIII, 5″x5″ $75


Americana IX web
Americana IX, 5″x5″ $75


Americana X web
Americana X, 5″x5″ $75


Americana XI web
Americana XI, 5″x5″ $75