28 Oct

Talking Politics at The Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum

“War Sucks,” the quilt that jump-started my Army Wife series and eventual social commentary quilts will be a part of this timely exhibit at the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum. I see my commentary quilts as conversation starters. They are my way of processing events and ideas that intrigue or vex me and they are my way of telling the world (or anyone who is willing to listen) what I think.

Unfortunately, I won;t be able to attend the show, but I invite anyone who will be in the Golden, Colorado area between now and January 21st to please go see this timely exhibit!

Patchwork Pundits Take on Politics
&
The Presidential Quilt Project

October 28th, 2016 – January 21st, 2017
The Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum
200 Violet Street; Suite 140
Golden, CO 80401

WarSucksweb

RMQM celebrates voters’ individualism through a display of politically themed quilts submitted by quilt community members from all over the country.  This exhibit brings political views, patriotic values, and social issues to light through quilt art in this election year.

The Presidential Quilt Project, curated by Sue Reich, will accompany RMQM’s Patchwork Pundits exhibit.  From the presidencies of George Washington through Barack Obama, the quilts help us enjoy American History and reflect on how quilt history has chosen to remember the U.S. Presidents. This exhibit of forty-three quilts represents each of the United States presidents to date.  RMQM is excited to host this beautiful and patriotic collection.

21 Mar

Home is Where the Army Sends Us

Along with Home Fires going to Rhode Island, I am honored to also have had my newest artwork, Home is Where The Army Sends Us accepted into the ground breaking exhibition at The George Washington University Museum/The Textile Museum, Stories of Migration.

Housed in the new George Washington University museum, The Textile Museum is hosting a juried exhibition in collaboration with SAQA, Stories of Migration: Contemporary Artists Interpret Diaspora. Works will include 3-D pieces, large installations, and video.

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photo by Mark Frey

This textile sculpture is a mobile village reflecting a military family’s canny ability, or heartfelt desire, to bring their communities with them when they relocate. The houses are created from old Army uniforms, an Army issue blanket, and bits and pieces of previous quilted projects in order to convey the lives lived in them. They also have crocheted roots, searching for purchase, but ultimately being dragged along wherever the mobile piece goes. I sent stickers along with the piece to be placed on the floor to encourage visitors to randomly move the village. Military moves are often last minute, and not always of the family’s choice, and are always on the horizon, so I wanted my artwork to reflect that instability. I can’t wait to hear from visitors if this aspect of the sculpture is realized.

Before I sent it off I tried to create a quick video of the village in various settings. I’d like there to be more locations and smoother transitions, but that will be a task when the piece comes back. For now, here’s a fun, quick, video we’ll call a rough sketch.

 

Stories of Migration

April 16th – September 4th, 2016
The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC

20 Mar

The Army Wife at Support and Defend

I’ve had a lot of rejections lately, and when compared to the job satisfaction I have working at the quilt shop, I’ve lately been pretty un-motivated to create any art or to look for places to show what I have. But then I get an opportunity, and I realize I can’t throw in the towel.

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The Army Wife: Home Fires (my very favorite of my apron series) has been chosen to be part of Support and Defend at The Art League of Rhode Island.

The exhibit is all about providing a way for U.S. Armed Forces veteran artists, currently serving or separated, and their immediate families, to share their military or veteran experiences through their own art, and to express its meaning to them in their own words. Every member of the U.S. Armed Forces takes an oath that includes the phrase “support and defend.”  For veterans and their family members, the experiences that follow that oath are specific to each individual and may be hard to grasp for those outside the Armed Forces community. Many of those experiences are complex and enduring–perhaps lifelong. This exhibition of 2D and 3D artworks, accompanied by the artists’ written words, will reflect the military experiences of veterans or their family members and create an opportunity and forum for artists to share a personal expression of that experience. Many veterans and their families want to tell their stories, but those conversations can be difficult to start. Often, art can be the starting place.

I submitted three aprons and Home Fires was chosen. If you are in Rhode Island in April or May, please take the time to see this important exhibit.

Support and Defend: Art Relevant to the Veteran Experience

The VETS Gallery, One Avenue of the Arts, Providence, RI 02906
Sponsored by Art League of Rhode Island
April 1 – May 29, 2016 Open Thursday and Friday afternoons
Opening reception April 14, 5:30 – 8:00 pm

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12 Jul

Homefront & Downrange Wrap Up

Friday was the last day of my co-exhibit at the Arts Council of Moore County in North Carolina. I packed up all my artwork and brought it home to get packed again, with all our household goods and moved to our new home in Portland, Oregon. It was wonderful show, and so much more than I could have dreamed up myself. I am thankful for the vision and dedicated work of director Chris Dunn and friend Nanette Zeller. The exhibit was a real community effort. Below is a short video by local videographers Brady and Laura Beck which shows the artwork and the festivities from the opening weekend of the show. Enjoy!

 

PS: the blog will be on hiatus while we move. Hopefully more regularly postings will resume mid-August (brace for house before and afters!).

31 May

Homefront & Downrange

It’s almost here! The day after tomorrow, I’m packing up my show and on Wednesday I’ll drive to North Carolina to set it up. There are all kinds of events planned around the event, to include  two receptions, a talk at a major sponsor’s place, hosting a SAQA regional meeting, a special military day (which sadly, I won’t be able to attend), and what is sure to be a fantastic exhibit with my textile art, photos by Hunter Rudd, and selected pieces from the Combat Paper project.

Homefront & Downrange

SuckitUpweb

June 5th – July 10th, 2015
Arts Council of Moore County
Campbell House
482 East Connecticut Avenue
Southern Pines, NC 28387

Using art as a catalyst for conversation, reflection, discovery, and education, HOMEFRONT & DOWNRANGE will take a deep and personal look at many aspects of military life:

An Army wife’s story through narrative textiles by Kristin La Flamme; A soldier’s story through photographs by Hunter Rudd; The story of returning home from combat through artwork selected from the Combat Paper Project; The story of military children through artwork selected by the Military Child Education Coalition.

21 Mar

Mementos

The latest addition to my Army Wife series. This is a collection of seven vintage hankies representing the seven deployments my husband had during his nearly 20 year military career. These were not the only times he was away from home, just the ones categorized as deployments. And I’m not presenting seven as an outrageous number to be pitied — it’s just a fact. In fact, it’s probably about average these days, especially since these deployments lasted anywhere from four to twelve months.

Hankie WIP 1

 

 

I was inspired by photographs of eyes I saw mounted in jewelry settings as pendants or pins, meant to be mementos of absent loved ones. The pieces I saw were from the early days of photography, but my understanding is that the practice of wearing images of the eyes of loved ones dates even further back. The idea seemed appropriate for my series.

Hankie WIP 2

 

I chose to put my eyes on hankies because I work in textiles, not jewelry, and because the retro look of these vintage hankies is already present in my other aprons and quilts. I’ve already appropriated WWII era aesthetics into my visual language. I chose to use a different eye photo for each hankie to emphasize that each deployment was a separate event. It was not so easy to find photos from circa 1996 and 1998 to scan and enlarge for the eyes!Hankie WIP 3

 

The collection will debut at the Homefront and Downrange show at the Arts Council of Moore County in June. They will be displayed in a table vitrine to emulate the look of opening a dresser drawer to access the collection.

Hankie WIP 4

08 Feb

Home Fires at Etui Fiber Arts

Last weekend I drove up to New York to hang my exhibit Home Fires at Etui Fiber Arts. We had a reception on Sunday which was unfortunately quiet — probably because of the impending storm and the Superbowl. The show looks fantastic though. The space is light and bright and shows off my work so well. The great news is that the show has been extended and will be on view at Etui until March 14th! We will have an artist talk on the 14th as well as a workshop by my friend Natalya Aikens, and an opportunity to just hang out and work on stitched or knitted projects. So, if you missed the opening reception, please join us for a closing party in March! And, of course, one can see the show any time between now and then.

Home Fires Exhibit

 

I would be remiss if I didn’t also say that Natalya was instrumental in helping me hang this show. She’s awesome. Plus, I got to hang out with her all week-end which is great. We went to the Katonah Museum of Art to see their current exhibit Line Describing a Cone, which was quite fascinating. It’s great to go to an exhibit with a friend and be able to discuss what we’re experiencing. We both really liked a very organic piece made with zip ties, and I liked a sculpture defined by light, while she was entranced by an installation with mirrors.  For most of the weekend (and bonus snow day) we talked and talked and talked, and, as happens every time we’re together, I came away with an inspired list of things to work on and new enthusiasm for my work. Artist play dates are great and I am so thankful that I have a group of wonderful artist girlfriends who all inspire me every day. I look forward to returning in March.

 

Home Fires Exhibit

Home Fires Exhibit

Home Fires Exhibit

Home Fires at Etui

27 Jan

Stitchy Stitchy

Have you seen the Feb/March 2015 issue of Quilting Arts?

 

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Jane Davila has written an informative article on ways to use seed stitch. It’s, in my biased opinion, beautifully illustrated! My Army Wife: Home Fires apron graces both the contents page and the first page of the article. I absolutely love the detail photo showing off my multi-colored and dense stitches. They are a lovely counterpoint to the more spare use of the stitch by Natalya Aikens, Deborah Boschert, and Gerrie Congdon highlighted on the next pages. I also need to say that I am so tickled the four artists chosen to show off this versatile stitch are also my close friends, mentors, and much respected peers. I hope we can share pages and galleries for years to come.

QA Stitch1