11 Nov

IQF Houston: Part 3

I’m always on the lookout for quilts and other fiber art in which the figure is treated well. That’s not to say that I want to see photo realism. In fact, I think those are the ones that most often fall short. What I like is the figure rendered well if realistic, and intentionally if abstracted or naïve. I was pleasantly surprised by many  I saw in Houston that I liked this year.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Organic is Good For You! by Bodil Gardner.
From the Good For You Exhibit. I love Bodil’s work — so much character and freedom!

IQF Houston 2011
Another quilt by Bodil Gardner. I forgot to get the name of it. I just love her charming ladies.

IQF Houston, 2011
Woman Waiting I, by Pamela Allen
Along with Bodil Gardner, Pam Allen is one of my perennial favorites. She uses primitive and whimsical forms in a wonderfully intentional way that I love.

IQF Houston, 2011
Tango with a Technopus, by Pam RuBert
Another Pam who renders the figure in a very intentional, and amusing, way.

IQF Houston, 2011
Population Explosion (detail) by Laura Fogg.
I took this detail photo for my friend Natalya who has some figures from her life drawing class which she has done on fabric and would like to incorporate into her textile work. I really like the way the stitched details overlap and blend the pieced areas, and compliment the gestural paintings.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Dreaming (detail), by Sonia Bardella
Part of the Text on Textile exhibit. Text AND figures — potential to go so wrong, but this one went pretty right.

IQF Houston, 2011

Solace, By Mary Pal.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Memories of Gombe, by Mary Pal
Honorable Mention. I love Mary Pal’s way with cheesecloth. She knows light light and form, and is so unique in the quilt show world.

IQF Houston, 2011
Just Call Me Jack, by Virginia Greaves
Here’s the usual posterized method of rendering figures in cloth. I thought this one did a good job and made no apologies for being made of fabric (love the obvious florals and checks).

IQF Houston, 2011
Self Portrait, by Joan Sowada.
I thought this one also did a good job and made no apologies for being made of fabric, especially where the plaid background interacts with the figures.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Dixie Dingo Dreaming by Susan Carlson.
Figures don’t need to be human either. Susan Carlson’s work inspired me years ago, and this one just renewed that spark. She does such a wonderful job of rendering form realistically, yet celebrating fabric as well.

Next up,  a small collection of photos that didn’t fit neatly into the plant, Hawaiian, or human categories.

10 Nov

IQF Houston: Part 2

I was going to write a bit about my time volunteering at the SAQA exhibit and what the organization has to offer art quilters at various places in their careers or craft. But, I’ve already forgotten what my big point was. Oh well, that means I can move on to the part most people are interested in: the quilts!

I did not take nearly as many photos this year as least, nor did I make much of an effort to see everything on display. I was having too much fun hanging out in the Twelve by Twelve exhibit! My main impression, especially with the World of Beauty quilts (the main section, eligible for prizes and awards) was that there was a LOT of sparkle. Beads, crystals, metallic thread, Angelina fibers, iridescent paint, the more bling the better.

Beyond the bling, I found looking at my photos, that I was attracted to a lot of plant-related quilts.

IQF Houston, 2011
Lemon Grass, by Cynthia Vogt.
Ahhh, the simplicity. I wish I could think of things like this.

IQF Houston, 2011
Solo Act, by Peg Collins
I liked this one even before I saw my favorite Kaffe Fasset print in it!

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Composition 1, by Miwako Mogami
Big! Big Fruit, big color, big patterns. I like it!

IQF Houston 2011

IQF Houston 2011
An Autumn Breeze, by Akiko Kawata.
Another of the very graphic quilts I am attracted to.

IQF Houston, 2011
Bountiful, by Carol Taylor
Loved the color palette and graphic quality of this (similar to Autumn Breeze above) and was surprised that it was made by the normally bright and geometric Carol Taylor.

IQF Houston, 2011
Salad With Pears, by Gail Segreto
Good For You Exhibit. Big, graphic, and zoomed in!

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
First Snow, by Lauren Strach.
Nice collage of discharged leaf patterns, but then made more special by all the hand and machine stitching.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Eat Your Vegetables by (?!). I am so sorry that I neglected to get the name of the artist of this piece.
Good For You Exhibit. a combo of silk(?) painting, and bead and button embellishment. It’s kinda like the love child of of Susan Shie’s and Pamela Allen’s work — two of my favorites.

IQF Houston 2011
Bugs and Other Things, by Pamela Allen
I love Pam’s work!

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Gossip Garden, by Debra Martinez
Another glittery one. It grew on me the more I looked at it. I like the whimsey and wackiness.

Last year I was drawn to the Hawaiian quilts, and this year the pull was stronger. In the meantime, I’ve also admired the work of Meg Maeda and her students, especially their use of radially dyed fabric. Although it is so amazingly different than either my art quilts or the bed quilts I usually make, Hawaiian quilting is taking it’s hold on me. Who knew it was Borg-like?

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Hawaiian Quilt, by Mi-Jung Kim.
The Hawaiian quilt bug is infecting me. I was drawn to every one I saw — especially those using radially dyed fabric. I live the way the colors can interact where the transitions on the foreground fabric align with the transitions on the background fabric. This is not the most subtle fabric combination (see Meg’s work for that), but the idea is there and the craftsmanship is fantastic.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Halemaumau (detail), by Takashi Kusaka.
No radially dyed fabric here, but I liked the particularly lush border on this one, and absolutely “get” the reference to the ferns and glowing lava around the Halemaumau crater at the top of Kilauea.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Lei Lani (detail), by Mineko Momose.
Another Hawaiian quilt with radially dyed fabrics. I’m hooked. Small radials form the hawaiian applique on separate blocks — yet another application for it.

IQF Houston, 2011
Feathers Aglow, by Judith Thompson.
I was drawn to this one because I thought, from afar, that it might fit into the Hawaiian-ish with radially dyed fabric category I’ve been attracted to. Upon closer look, it was carefully chosen and placed commercial fabrics, but I still love the clean, graphic, quality of this.

IQF Houston, 2011

Next up will be quilts with figures — a pet peeve of mine. I was pleasantly surprised to see quite a few that I thought were outstanding.

23 Jul

Long Beach

This weekend is the Quilt Festival in Long Beach, California. If you happen to be there, please see the special exhibit “Tactile Architecture 2009” and say hello to my quilt, “Aquifer.” (I am also happy to report that I’ll have two quilts in the next Tactile Architecture  — which will debut in Houston in the Fall.)

And while you are enjoying the Long Beach show, be sure to also see “Beneath The Surface” featuring quilts by my Twelve by Twelve friends Gerrie, Deborah, Karen and sorry, I was remiss and forgot to add her — Terry.