26 Jun

Colors of Polynesia

Where I used to post about German fests and castles, now it’s all tropical dances and food! Here are some images from our day at the Polynesian Cultural Center here on Oahu. Hopefully made more relevant to my creative journey blog in their arrangement by color. Everything should be clickable for a little bit bigger view. There’s also more on Flickr.

Clockwise from upper left: Hawaiian hula in plantation era costumes, traditional hula skirt or “pa’u,” Tahitian dancers, Hawaiian dancers.

Clockwise from upper left: Tahitian dancers, Fijian or Samoan dancers (I can’t remember), Tongan drummer, skirt made from the inner bark of the wild hibiscus tree.

Clockwise from upper left: Hawaiian hula kahiko dancers with feather rattles, Tahitian dancers with I’i hand implements, Samoan fire knife dancer, Hawaiian kahili, or royal standards.

Clockwise from upper left: Taro, Maori woman from Aotearoa (New Zealand) performing the haka as a welcome, Maori man performing another part of the ceremonial greeting, Maori group singing.

Clockwise from upper left: Fijian house for sacrifices, Hawaiian checkers (konane), Fijian tattoo for a king, Fijian outrigger canoe.

25 Mar

Sidetracked

When I go to the Hawai’i Quilt Guild meetings, I usually go with a friend who found me through this blog and her granddaughter who happens to live near me. The granddaughter is a high school senior and is part of her school’s culinary arts program. Their big end of year research project is to plan a wedding: create a menu that they would cater and source the food, choose linens and table decor, location, cake, price entertainment, and probably a few other things. She’s decided her project will be a morning wedding on a beach. We tossed out ideas and compared wedding stories over dinner post-meeting. I envisioned a simple, classic, tiered cake with sandy colored fondant and sugar sea shells. My friend improved on the idea with those marbled Belgian chocolate shells. This led to visions of white linens, woven mats and hurricane lamps or apothecary jars filled with sea shells (no need for candles in the morning). Red coral seemed an appropriate exotic accent in the jars, which led to orange lei for the guests as well. I was really taken by the idea of a neutral wedding with accents of orange and spent the entire next morning making an “inspiration page” of images I found on the web (I’m not posting it here since it’s for personal use and I don’t want to mess with copyright issues or trying to link to every source, but imagine sea breezes and rustic chic). As much fun as finding all the parts was, I was really liking the colors. So, I made a palette, a la Vicky. It wasn’t looking as great as the inspiration or the vision in my head and I quickly realized that the proportions were wrong. Too much orange. So, I messed around a bit more and now the palette looks like a fabulous quilt block. Too bad the wedding isn’t a real one — I could make a quilt for the happy couple.