11 Nov

IQF Houston: Part 3

I’m always on the lookout for quilts and other fiber art in which the figure is treated well. That’s not to say that I want to see photo realism. In fact, I think those are the ones that most often fall short. What I like is the figure rendered well if realistic, and intentionally if abstracted or naïve. I was pleasantly surprised by many  I saw in Houston that I liked this year.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Organic is Good For You! by Bodil Gardner.
From the Good For You Exhibit. I love Bodil’s work — so much character and freedom!

IQF Houston 2011
Another quilt by Bodil Gardner. I forgot to get the name of it. I just love her charming ladies.

IQF Houston, 2011
Woman Waiting I, by Pamela Allen
Along with Bodil Gardner, Pam Allen is one of my perennial favorites. She uses primitive and whimsical forms in a wonderfully intentional way that I love.

IQF Houston, 2011
Tango with a Technopus, by Pam RuBert
Another Pam who renders the figure in a very intentional, and amusing, way.

IQF Houston, 2011
Population Explosion (detail) by Laura Fogg.
I took this detail photo for my friend Natalya who has some figures from her life drawing class which she has done on fabric and would like to incorporate into her textile work. I really like the way the stitched details overlap and blend the pieced areas, and compliment the gestural paintings.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Dreaming (detail), by Sonia Bardella
Part of the Text on Textile exhibit. Text AND figures — potential to go so wrong, but this one went pretty right.

IQF Houston, 2011

Solace, By Mary Pal.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Memories of Gombe, by Mary Pal
Honorable Mention. I love Mary Pal’s way with cheesecloth. She knows light light and form, and is so unique in the quilt show world.

IQF Houston, 2011
Just Call Me Jack, by Virginia Greaves
Here’s the usual posterized method of rendering figures in cloth. I thought this one did a good job and made no apologies for being made of fabric (love the obvious florals and checks).

IQF Houston, 2011
Self Portrait, by Joan Sowada.
I thought this one also did a good job and made no apologies for being made of fabric, especially where the plaid background interacts with the figures.

IQF Houston, 2011

IQF Houston, 2011
Dixie Dingo Dreaming by Susan Carlson.
Figures don’t need to be human either. Susan Carlson’s work inspired me years ago, and this one just renewed that spark. She does such a wonderful job of rendering form realistically, yet celebrating fabric as well.

Next up,  a small collection of photos that didn’t fit neatly into the plant, Hawaiian, or human categories.

6 thoughts on “IQF Houston: Part 3

  1. Well, you zeroed right in on many of my favorites as well. It was wonderful to see Susan Carlson’s dog. I have always loved her work and haven’t seen much lately.

  2. I missed some of these so I’m glad to see them here. I love the Mary Pal work. I’ve tried to buy them on the SAQA auction but someone always beats me to it.

  3. Oooh, Kristin! Thanks so much! I’m enjoying to see the differences between what you choose and what Maria Elkins selected for her blog post on the same topic. This is especially fun for someone who hasn’t been to the Big H and probably will never make it! Thanks Thanks Thanks!

    Lisa

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