26 Jun

Expo Magic Quilt at le Sucriére

On Saturday, the majority of our group went to a mideaval town with a small quilt show. Kathy and I opted to stay in Lyon and go to the Magic Patch Expo at le Sucriére, a sugar factory converted into an exhibition site. I was supposed to meet two ladies from the online group, Texies, which I belong to. Unfortunately, I waited, but not necessarily in the right place, and didn’t meet the ladies. The photos are a bit wonky because many of the quilts were hung very high as the space had high ceilings. The quilts were mainly hung around the perimeter with booths in the middle. On the ground floor were mostly vendors, but on the upper floor were artists sharing their techniques and their artwork. It was all very open and casual. They had a few workshops too. We got a quick lesson in making an evening bag from a square of fabric while we were there.
Le Sucriére

Color Play III by Linea Hassing-Nielson of Denmark is the most unusual Pineapple quilts I have ever seen:

Color Play III, by Linea Hassing-Nielson

Another unusual piece was this one by Elisabeth LeDall. Not only does it incorporate cool origami-inspired flappy things, but she’s tucked crocheted balls between the squares.

By Elisabeth LeDall

More quilts by Russian artists. Sorry Daniela, I didn’t see any group of quilts from “Little Pieces” or Smaranda. Or maybe I did and I just didn’t know it. There were some lovely little quilts by Russian artists, but the group seemed to have another name. I liked the funky birds on this piece, Splinters of Sunny Summer, by Natasha Laritsova.

Splinters of Sunny Summer, by Natasha Laritsova

There was group of quilts by Australian artists. I think I might need to move to Australia as an understudy or something. I seem to be loving everything quilty that comes out of that country! I loved the simplicity of Approaching, by Karen Gray (hand and machine quilting and discharge dying if I interpreted it correctly):
Approaching, by Helen Gray

This is Dust Storm by Beth Miller, also Australian. Again, I was drawn to the simplicity. There’s a wealth of different fabrics below, and one perfect one above.

Dust Storm by Beth Miller

Old Pods by Jenny Bowker. I love the use of burlap as a background fabric. The prints on top make it look very mid century modern, yet it’s not trendy.

Old Pods, by Jenny Bowker

Dianne Firth had one piece at the Expo, I think in the Husqvarna show. This one was along the same lines. She essentially just uses strips of striped fabric, but of course, they are artfully arranged. This is titled The Soak:

The Soak, by Dianne Firth

If I don’t move to Australia, I think I’ll go to the Netherlands. If I liked a quilt there was a good chance it was from there. I’ve been admiring the work of Mirjam Pet-Jacobs for a while and not only did she have work both at the Quilt Expo and the Expo Magic Quilt, but she also had a little booth to show off her work and techniques. She was away when we arrived, but her colleague gave us a little demo on how Ms. Pet-Jacobs makes these cute little bowls. They’d be perfect for those knitting leftovers. Mirjam corrected me here: The small basket you showed was made by my friend and artist Rita Berghuis-Ensing; but it’s alright, I make them as well, only a little smaller.
Bowl by Mirjam Pet-Jacobs

Pentimento #4 by Mirjam Pet-Jacobs:

Pentimento #4 by Mirjam Pet-Jacobs

This is a detail of one of her other works. I like the use of crazy patching to get more depth of color into a basicly solid area. Then she doesn’t go over the top in adding a focal element.
Detail of quilt by Mirjam Pet-Jacobs

She uses these simple figures a lot. I like them. She had two other fascinating quilts without these figures, one at the Expo and one at Magic Quilt, which related to Alzheimer’s Disease. This one was by her booth, I don’t know the title. More info from Mirjam: The long narrow quilt with the armless figure is one of six panels, called The other Muses. More info about the figures (Mimis) can be found on my website.
by Mirjam Pet-Jacobs

In honor of Hans Christian Anderson, the Danish quilters showed works that related to his stories. I’m not sure if this one by Bettina Anderson was part of the group, but it was silky and glowed, and had subtle seed stiching, and reminded me a bit of Gerrie’s litturgical piece.

by Bettina Anderson

This one is Cloud Berry Swamp, by Lena Wik. I don’t know what story it goes to, but I like it.

Cloud Berry Swamp by Lena Wik

No Doubt About It by Barbara Stougaard:

No Doubt About It,by Barbara Stougaard

I liked this series of three quilts exploring color and form by Turid Lismoen of Norway.

Green Chair, Red Chair, and Blue Chair, by Turid Lismoen

Simmilarly bright, there were a bunch of quilts by Laura Wasilowski like this Pear Trio:

Pear Trio by laura Wasilowski

There were three quilts by Olivia Uffer of France. This one, Méditation, was my favorite, but they all had three dimensional additions, shiny fabrics, buttons and beads, and a wonderfull whimsy to them.

Meditation, by Olivia Uffer

This is a detail of one of the houses. It’s so perfectly constructed. I love it!

Méditation detail by Olivia Uffer

These little cuties were by Margo van Strien of the Dutch group Texuis (www.texui.nl)

Why Us and Not them

This was part of a challenge or competition with the theme Dream Gardens. It was my favorite because it is based on a child’s drawing. Well that and that it is well made too. It’s called Le Jardin de Morphée vu par Claudia, 5 ans et demi, by Michéle Clares of France.
Le Jardin de Morphée vu par Claudia, 5 ans et demi, by Michéle Clares

This entry is Magnolia, by Jutta Erner of Germany. I was supposed to meet Jutta, but it didn’t happen. So, in lieu of meeting in person, here I am as stunt double by her quilt.

magnolia, by Jutta Erner

We thoroughly enjoyed the day and were so glad that we had the time to amble through the exhibits. I had a great weekend with friends, inspiration and good food and scenery. I wish I could do it all again next weekend. Well, all except the eight hour drive.

9 thoughts on “Expo Magic Quilt at le Sucriére

  1. Wow, what an incredible quilt show. I LOVE those chair quilts. So simple yet remarkable. And a great quilt from a child’s drawing. I’d love to see that French houses quilt in person. Wheeeee.

  2. wonderful!
    the pictures you took are gorgeous… oh how i´d love to be able to quilt like you or one of those artists (btw: they are dumb to reject your quilts!)! it´s pure inspiration…
    i like the dress you pictured in your entry above, it´s very stylish though very simple. clear, clean shape. maybe i should give this one a try when i have *lots* of spare time…

    in the end it sounds like you had a nice weekend with those ladies and you are “filled up” with inspiration for your next pieces.
    i´m sure they will compete with the ones you´ve seen in lyon.

  3. I’m speechless… Those chairs! Those 3-d houses! The bits of text on the quilts! The lines! The color! How could you take it all in?

  4. Kristin,

    Thanks for posting all those gorgeous pics! You must be so inspired…I love the town you are creating with the shopping bags…

  5. Thank you so much Kristin, for bringing the show and all the town secrets to us.
    It was such a pleasure for me to see all those wonderful pieces through your eyes and to feel and share your excitement.

    Much appreciated your intention to find Smaranda. She also ask me about you and regret that you don’t succed to meet her.

  6. Hi. Thank you for you kind words. It’s always great to hear them.
    The small basket you showed was made by my friend and artist Rita Berghuis-Ensing; but it’s alright, I make them as well, only a little smaller.
    The long narrow quilt with the armless figure is one of six panels, called The other Muses. They will be exhibited this Summer in Soest, the Netherlands. More info about the figures (Mimis) can be found on my website.
    The cute creatures are made by Margo van Strien, one of my textile group TeXui (www.texui.nl)

  7. Hi. Thank you for you kind words. The small basket you showed was made by my friend and artist Rita Berghuis-Ensing; but it’s alright, I make them as well, only a little smaller.
    The long narrow quilt with the armless figure is one of six panels, called The other Muses. More info about the figures (Mimis) can be found on my website.
    The cute creatures are made by Margo van Strien, one of my textile group TeXui (www.texui.nl)

  8. Hi Kristin,
    It was great to see a review of the quilt show. Did you see my quilts at the exhibit? One that would be easy to remember was my Quite-A-Cat. A house cat doing household duties would best describe this quilt. Thanks for sharing. I was not able to attend.

Comments are closed.